Tag Archives: Author

Spotify Word Genre

by Lindy

I’m not sure if you’re already familiar with Spotify or not. It is one of the numerous options available to listen to music – on your phone, PC, tablet. (It’s free with ads/paid for ad-free).

I’m always looking for the ideal channel to tune into on Spotify for just the right music to work and be productive. It’s hit or miss a lot of the time. You might like one song, but not the next 20. (But I’m too lazy to do a few extra clicks to change it up.)

Lately, I’ve discovered a random and interesting genre on Spotify called ‘Word’ (at the very bottom of the options under ‘Browse’). It is so intriguing… When trying to focus on work, you can’t really listen to and absorb it all, but it’s nice to have on in the background to take some of your mind off the mundane. Check it out: https://open.spotify.com/genre/word.

Spotify Word

The Spotify Word playlists are eclectic and unique – poetry, speeches, stories, meditation, self help, foreign languages, vintage radio, children’s stories, presidential voices and more. They have specific writers featured in some playlists as well – Shakespeare, Bronte, Jane Austen, Noam Chomsky, Emily Dickinson… You can learn what you might have missed in high school English!

The voice actors can be varied, dramatic and entertaining. A few times I’ve tuned into the Shakespeare poetry playlist and got entranced in it. It’s nearly impossible to comprehend what is being said, but it transports you to another place in time. Then, at random, you start speaking in Old English to your colleagues.

I highly recommend exploring it for yourself. Play some for the children in your life for good measure. It’s truly a fun and passive learning experience.

Save

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Book Publicity: Midlife Opportunity

by Lindy

My friend and author, Barrett Clemmensen Powell, has written a book that is geared to people in the mid-life age bracket – Midlife Opportunity. My ‘Lit Chicks Anonymous’ book club is currently reading The Husband’s Secret, but Barrett’s book is on my reading list. (Although I’m in denial of this midlife phenomenon).

Please take a read of Barrett’s book and leave a review on Amazon and/or Good Reads.

Barrett Clemmensen Powell - Midlife Opportunity

Barrett Clemmensen Powell – Midlife Opportunity

Midlife Opportunity: Power, Money and Wellbeing in Your Late 30s & Early 40s

Early midlife (ages 37-44) is a time when we can go through midlife transition or have a midlife crisis. The attainment of money and power still looms large but the third “leg” that provides a stable, and good life is wellbeing.

This book examines the four “journeys” we take in early midlife and the generations of the 20th and 21st century at midlife. Wellbeing is within walking distance — it is attainable if you choose to journey well. As the author explains, you do not need to be a millionaire; you do need to plan for the future and handle your finances responsibly.

You do not need to be a CEO of a company; you do need to be an honorable, trustworthy person with integrity in your family, among your friends and at work. You do not need to be an Ironman or a fashion model; you do need to take good care of your body, mind and spirit.


Bryan Elliott on Why You Should Pick Yourself

by Lindy

Linked OC - Seth Godin - March 15, 2013

Bryan Elliott, founder of the progressive networking group, Linked OC, emailed a poignant story to our group today that was very touching and encouraging. I know his story will resonate with so many people; we could all benefit from learning the important lesson of PICKING YOURSELF.


This idea of ‘Picking Yourself’ will be the featured topic at the upcoming March 15th LinkedOC with bestselling author and thought leader Seth Godin. Godin will be speaking on his latest book, The Icarus Deception: How High Will You Fly?

Here is Bryan’s Story
(used with permission)

I just finished writing my next article for Entrepreneur Magazine, (working title) 3 Reasons to Pick Yourself where I shared part of an important lesson learned a long time ago and again recently by reading Seth Godin’s new book.

The full article will be published on Thursday this week but I didn’t include all of the personal details and I’d like the share the full story with some confessions and embarrassing truths here with you, my loyal tribe, with the hope that this helps at least one person…

1 out of the 3 reasons to pick yourself (vs waiting to get picked by someone else) is:

1. You are NOT going to get picked.

For me, waiting to get picked always conjures up painful memories of the elementary school playground. I was in 5th grade and loved to play sports, especially basketball. The problem was that I hadn’t hit my growth spurt yet and was one of the shortest kids on the court. I usually got picked last or not at all when we split up teams.

It’s sad to admit but more than 30 years later I’m still kind of pissed at Mr Hamblin, the PE coach, who mocked me because I was in his words, “too short to play” in the coveted Teachers vs Students basketball game on the last day of the school year. This and other times of rejection left me feeling frustrated and misunderstood. I was pretty good at sports (by 5th grade standards) but I was being judged solely on my height. I often sat on the sidelines feeling defeated with resentment and great contempt for tall people!

This pattern continued on into high school and although I worked hard to earn a spot on the varsity team in 3 different sports, I was often ignored or given limited playing time by coaches who preferred to play the bigger kids who were in their minds “a sure thing” to win games. (that’s me below in my freshman year).

Bryan Elliott

Bryan Elliott, high school football

In business I continue to experience the feeling of being ignored, passed over, exploited, rejected and being treated unfairly all the time. I have felt defeated and wondered where my friends were when I needed them most. I have felt desperate and alone. I have felt the resentment and contempt for those in power who didn’t pick me after nailing the job interview; after years of thankless service; for well deserved promotions; new projects or whatever.

I confess that I’ve held grudges–even for things that are ancient history…
During my darkest moments when I lost sight of hope, I was so miserable that I was tempted to blame others or outside circumstances for my misfortune–real or perceived–to the point that I wanted to retaliate and seek revenge.

I’ve heard it said that “holding a grudge is like drinking poison and waiting for the other person to die.” It’s true, I’ve had a taste of it.

Here’s what I’ve learned:

Some people, like Coach Hamblin, suck. Yes, we will be treated unfairly by unforeseen circumstances or people–deliberately or without malice–and either way isn’t fun. But we shouldn’t be surprised when adversity or rejection come, nor allow the applause or lack of, to determine our worth. This is the journey we’re on.

The path that used to be safe and secure–that cushy, high-paying job at the glamorous brand or position that is never in jeopardy of being downsized–is gone. At any moment the tightrope you’re walking on can get cut out from under you. And there’s no safety net.

Whether you work for someone else and love it, spend your days sending out resumes or are confined to a soul-sucking cubicle, there’s comfort in knowing that there’s an alternate choice: Pick yourself.

Don’t waste time playing to an audience who couldn’t care less about your tune. Don’t waste another breath of air trying to convince the unconvinced. There’s a danger after you’ve been rejected so many times…tell me if this sounds familiar:

  • You want to crawl under a rock and stop trying…
  • You start believing the critics or crickets and settle for less…
  • You get mad or resentful every time you hear the word “no” feeling undervalued and unappreciated…
  • You sabotage relationships or opportunities by rejecting them before (you think) they reject you as a defense mechanism…
  • You start using those in power as the scapegoat or excuse for your less-than-awesome output or performance…

Don’t do this. Don’t give them power by giving in. Keep your chin up, find the right audience or do better work until you get noticed. Never quit.

Seth said this in his latest book, “The Icarus Deception”:

“Our cultural instinct is to wait to get picked. To seek out permission, authority and safety that come from someone who says, ‘I pick you.’ Once you reject the impulse and realize that no one is going to select you—that Prince Charming has chosen another house in his search for Cinderella—then you can actually get to work.”

I would love to hear your thoughts on this either publicly on our FB page, or privately by replying to this email.

–Bryan Elliott
Founder, Linked OC

Twitter: @BryanElliott
LinkedIn: /in/BryanDElliott
FB: /BryanElliott

Linked Orange County is about: Connecting. Business. People.

Our mission is to be a hub for thought leadership, entrepreneurs, small businesses and start-ups with emphasis on helping our members prosper and contributing to the growth of the Orange County economy.

We are a leading business community network connecting the disconnected to create value among our members and in the community.

Our main purpose is:

* Connecting buyers & sellers
* Connecting information seekers with information
* Connecting teams, collaborators and innovators to each other
* Connecting those with similar business goals
* Connecting job hunters with jobs
* Connecting organizations spending money with ways to save money
* Connecting like-minded, passionate people into a movement

What is your story?


Random Page: On the Art of Writing Fiction

by Lindy

Here is a random page from a book titled, On the Art of Writing Fiction By Mrs. Molesworth, Sabine Baring-Gould published in 1894. This page is from a chapter on ‘Style in Fiction’ by W.E. Norris.

This book discovery was made possible by Google Books.

 

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Finish Your Novel – November is NaNoWriMo Month!

by Lindy

Last year was my first NaNoWriMo experience, and I actually hit the 50,000 word mark and WON! If you are interested, it was is a chick lit novel about a new mom figuring out all the craziness of trying to juggle her work, friends, marriage and motherhood, with many humorous twists throughout. No, I haven’t completely finished or published it. It’s sitting on my hard drive mocking me; but at least I hit the 50,000 word goal!

This year, I decided not to participate in the challenge due to time constraints and other commitments, but I am still inspired by the creative writing process and the supportive community that is NaNoWriMo. I love how writers of all ages, stages of life and from all over the world embark on writing a 50,000-word fictional story in under 30 days each year. I also love the team at the Office of Letters and Light that inspire writers to keep up their craft.

Office of Letters and Light
We believe in ambitious acts of the imagination.

The Office of Letters and Light organizes events where children and adults find the inspiration, encouragement, and structure they need to achieve their creative potential. Our programs are web-enabled challenges with vibrant real-world components, designed to foster self-expression while building community on local and global levels. 

Here is a wonderful article written by Thaïs Miller on the OLL blog: 10 Tips on Finishing Your NaNoWriMo Novel. Thaïs Miller is an author of novels, short stories, and poetry, as well as a writing instructor at Gotham Writers’ Workshop.

Here’s my advice for completing a 50,000-word novel within 30 days:

  1. Be confident, not critical. NaNoWriMo is about word count, not about perfection or style. Think of this as a first draft. Just produce, produce, produce.
  2. Write about an idea you’re obsessed with and can’t get out of your mind. Remember, your novel can always change tracks.
  3. When you’re tired of writing about that main idea, create subplots to fill pages. When I was sick of writing about the influence of a death machine, I wrote a love story subplot.
  4. Write scenes. Scenes with narration, dialogue, action, and description take up more space than expository information.
  5. Set a word minimum everyday. NaNoWriMo recommends 1667, but if you’ve fallen behind, increase that. Do not set a daily hour minimum because some days you’ll write more quickly than others. Tell yourself that you can’t go to bed until you reach that minimum number of words. Keep track of your word count by checking the number of words in your document at the beginning and end of each day.
  6. If you miss a day, then make up those words as soon as possible. Some people prefer to make up those missing words on the weekend when they have more time. Whatever you do, don’t wait until the end of the month.
  7. Don’t write linearly. Bounce around, writing scenes that occur at different points in the novel. During one week, for example, write a scene that takes place at the end of your story, then one that takes place in the middle, and one that takes place in the beginning. This keeps you interested in the material and prevents you from feeling stuck. Leave markers for areas that you want to come back to and fill in. On days when you feel uninspired, go to these markers and start writing those missing scenes.
  8. At some point, it doesn’t really matter when, create an outline to organize your scenes.
  9. Don’t delete anything unless it’s 100% necessary to make the novel seem cohesive or coherent. Erasure will move you in the opposite direction of where you want to go. Temporarily cut scenes instead and save them in a different file. You never know when an extraneous scene might become useful. If you do delete a scene, then replace it.
  10. Find a quiet writing space that you can regularly use like a public library or a bedroom. One of my colleagues even writes in a closet. Try not to piss off your roommates.

I will likely participate in the NaNoWriMo challenge again next year, so if you’re inclined to, I highly encourage it!


Eat, Pray, Love AND Create

by Lindy

Elizabeth Gilbert, author of the best-selling memoir, turned movie, Eat, Pray, Love spoke brilliantly at a Ted Talk on “Your Elusive Creative Genius” in Long Beach, California in 2009.

It is so insightful, authentic, inspirational and motivational. It certainly sheds new light on the creative process and the origins of creativity. Gilbert’s talk is described as:

Elizabeth Gilbert muses on the impossible things we expect from artists and geniuses — and shares the radical idea that, instead of the rare person “being” a genius, all of us “have” a genius. — Ted.com

Some of her wonderful quotes that stand out in this Ted Talk are:

“‘Ole!’ to you, just for having the sheer human love and stubbornness to keep showing up.”

“I have had work or ideas come through me from a source that I honestly cannot identify. What is that thing? And how are we to relate to it in a way that will not make us lose our minds, but, in fact, might actually keep us sane?”

“Maybe [artistry] doesn’t have to be quite so full of anguish if you never happened to believe, in the first place, that the most extraordinary aspects of your being came from you. But maybe if you just believed that they were on loan to you from some unimaginable source for some exquisite portion of your life to be passed along when you’re finished … it starts to change everything.”

 


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