Home

Down the Rabbit Hole – From Portlandia to the Northwest Passage

by Lindy

I went down another virtual rabbit hole this week. This is how it went.

I was working in my home office doing tasks on one monitor while watching Netlix on the other monitor, as usual. Yes, two monitors are better than one! I selected Portlandia to watch as it prompted me that there were new episodes. Instead of recognizing which episode I’d watched last, it played episode one. I loved it! It reminded me again how funny and clever the comedy was – I was hooked immediately again by the intro song, “The Dream of the 90s is Alive in Portland.”

“Portland is a city where young people go to retire!”

“In Portland you can just put a bird on something and call it art!”

Then I saw in the song credits that it was from an album called ‘Songs of the Northwest’. So after watching several episodes of Portlandia, I went to YouTube to search for more Songs of the Northwest. Imagine my glee when I stumbled on some awesome historical videos on the development of the Pacific Northwest with all the lumberjack footage!

Then I saw a song recommendation pop up: Stan Rogers’ Northwest Passage; I had a sneaking suspicion that that was the musician I was trying to remember from when I first listened to it in the 90s!! I had purchased an old cassette tape at a garage sale in Bellingham and went through a phase of listening to this awesome Canadian folk music; although friends may have found it a little odd when Sir Mix A Lot’s Baby Got Back was also one of my faves of the time. But to find it on YouTube with actual video of the song and learn a little bit more about the history was awesome!

I stayed up a little longer than I should have that night! The Canadians are very proud of this song apparently and think it should replace the existing Canadian Anthem; no joke. I tend to agree – it’s hard not to be moved by the lyrics and the music. It makes you honor those adventurous explorers who risked it all to journey into the unknown. I like how the video poster said, “This video is dedicated to all who have journeyed north and west (and south and east) ‘to find there but the road back home again'”.

I love these final lyrics:

How then am I so different from the first men through this way?
Like them, I left a settled life, I threw it all away.
To seek a Northwest Passage at the call of many men
To find there but the road back home again.

The rabbit hole didn’t end there; I ended up watching videos on ‘Occupy Cascadia’ – the Northwest Region of British Columbia, Washington and Oregon. I found that very interesting, but I’ll save that for another day. There is more for me to explore in that regard.

    


Norwegian Vacation Part 2 – Family Reunion

by Lindy

It’s been over 100 years since Lauritz Anton Kjønnerud (Kenrud is the Americanized surname) and Elise Marie Hagan left their homes in Larvik, Norway – the southern coastal region. (Home of Thor Heyerdahl, Kon-Tiki adventurer.) They left Norway (independently) in the early 1900s for better lives; times were tough in Norway and America promised a land of opportunities. Lauritz and Elise are my maternal great-grandpa and great-grandma. They were married in Couer d’Alene, Idaho on August 30, 1913 (exactly 90 years before my wedding anniversary on the same date!)

I am fortunate that my grandpa Andy (Lauritz’s son) and uncle Kern (Lauritz’s grandson) maintained contact with some of our family in Norway and that I’ve had the chance to get to know them throughout the past 10 years; especially with the ease of email and Facebook. The Sons of Norway in Seattle helped to reconnect my grandpa with his Norwegian relatives after Lauritz and Elise died, leaving him and his brother orphans. Kern has also passed on the letters between the families in Norwegian and old photos of their first homestead in Bellingham, Washington. Having the opportunity to see these has left a lasting impression on me and I’m honored to have this legacy to share with my children.

Photo Credit: Lindy Neubauer

Lauritz, Ralph and Andy Kenrud, Bellingham, WA

Photo Credit: Lindy Neubauer

Elise on the farm, Bellingham, WA

Photo Credit: Lindy Neubauer

Ralph and Andy (great uncle and grandpa) cutting wood, Bellingham, WA

Photo Credit: Lindy Neubauer

Lauritz, Ralph and Andy Kenrud, Bellingham, WA

Photo Credit: Lindy Neubauer

Fishing in Bellingham, WA

Photo Credit: Lindy Neubauer

Lauritz, Ralph and Andy Kenrud

Photo Credit: Lindy Neubauer

Ralph and Andy Kenrud, my grandpa and great uncle

Photo Credit: Lindy Neubauer

Elise, Andy and Ralph Kenrud | Bellingham, WA

Photo Credit: Lindy Neubauer

Lauritz and Elise in Bellingham, Washington

My husband and I visited my family in Larvik first in 2004 and then in 2011, some came to visit our family in Seattle and now we’ve just returned from our big family trip to Norway where we were able to spend quality time with most of the cousins and great uncles/aunts. It was an incredible experience for me and impactful for my children as well. Kiersten (5) is now smitten with her cousin Jakob and claims to want to marry him and Brendan (2) perpetually stuck by Jana’s side. They all played so well together despite the language barrier.

Photo Credit: Lindy Neubauer

Driving from Oslo to Larvik

We had five days of spending time with all the family, rotating visits to everyone’s houses. Highlights were having late night conversations with our accommodating hosts Kristian (cousin) and Heike, as well as tasting various new liquors with them, having a fun cookout at the beach in Stavern with waffles, sausages and lefse, spending a day with Kjell (great uncle) and Inger eating and reviewing ancestry documents, meeting a new cousin from my great-grandma’s lineage, Heidi, and hearing all the creative things she’s involved with at her job, seeing and learning about Henrik Ibsen’s ‘Rat Virgin’ sculpture in Skien on the Telemark canal, meeting younger Kristian and Ingrid’s new baby girl, Line, and Kristian taking the kids on a tour of his police station in Skien. It was wonderful seeing Beate (cousin) and Espen’s home and tasting a traditional Norwegian soup with flatbread and lots of butter. We also had a great time seeing Håkon (cousin) and Reidun’s home and getting to know them more. We also got to meet another cousin of Kristian, Espen and his wife Pham and their two lovely daughters. They had lived in the U.S. before, so there was a lot to talk about. Of course, there never is enough time and I’m sad we didn’t get more time with everyone. I’m certain we will visit them again someday though.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Brendan and Inger, great aunt, Larvik, Norway

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Norwegian dinner; Larvik, Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Brendan, Jana and Heike; Larvik, Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Beate and Brendan + me; Larvik, Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Beate, Inger, Kjell and Kiersten; Larvik., Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Delicious Norwegian Jello Dessert

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Delicious Norwegian Meatballs, courtesy of Inger.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Lindy and Kjell reviewing ancestry documents; Larvik., Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Inger, Annika and Kiersten; Larvik., Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Kjell and his grand nieces; Larvik., Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Lindy and Heidi; Larvik, Norway.
Creative cousins.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Lindy, Heidi and Annika, Larvik, Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Frozen row boat in Larvik, Norway

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Hungry swan. Larvik, Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Playing on the beach; Larvik, Norway

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Henrik Ibsen’s ‘Rat Virgin’ Sculpture. Skien, Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Climbing up the ‘Rat Virgen’; Skien, Norway

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Kids taking over the computers. Skien, Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Welcoming Kristian’s new baby girl, Line.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Ane reading to Kiersten. Skien, Norway

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Skien family. Beate, Reidun, Ane, Espen, Jakob, Oscar + me, Annika, Kiersten, Brendan.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Traditional Norwegian soup, courtesy of Beate. Skien, Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Legos are universal. Jakob, Oscar and Brendan; Skien, Norway.

Brendan and Jakob at the police station in Skien, Norway.

Brendan and Jakob at the police station in Skien, Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Annika, Kiersten, Baby Line and Ingrid.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Dressed for the weather. Stavern, Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Staying warm at the beach. Stavern, Norway

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Beach cookout, Stavern, Norway

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

The girls: Jana, Annika, Kiersten. Stavern, Norway

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Jana locked up in Stavern, Norway

The Guys' Jonathan, Brendan, Kristian. Stavern, Norway.

The Guys’ Jonathan, Brendan, Kristian. Stavern, Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Stavern, Norway

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Beautiful Norwegian girls, Ane and Julie. Larvik, Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Kids’ table for celebration dinner. Larvik, Norway

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Bear hug. Kristian and Brendan. Larvik, Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Family photo with Håkon taking the photo. Larvik, Norway.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Strong liquor.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Stronger
liquor.

Some of the things I loved about Larvik and Skien was the stunning, natural beauty, the crisp fresh air and the kind, authentic people. I enjoyed the traditional Norwegian meals with lots of bread, cheese, meat, fish and spreads on open-faced sandwiches and especially the meatballs and potatoes. I loved how everyone is active outside despite the cold weather; you can see bicyclers, runners, hikers and soccer players everywhere. There is a Norwegian saying we’ve learned, “There’s no such thing as bad weather; just bad clothing.” So true! I became adept at dressing in layers and was quite warm and comfortable. I really like the cold-weather, Nordic fashion with a blend of rugged function and beauty. I also love Norwegian design and decor in their homes; it’s so natural, rustic and quaint with a lot of personal touches.

Now that I’m back in the U.S., I reflect a lot on my ancestry and the people who came before me, their journey, as well as what aspects of me are distinctly Norwegian (stubbornness, determination, outdoorsy, down to earth.) I like to think I’m Norwegian even if just 75% of me is and I can’t speak the language well and I’m the 3rd generation in America (on both my parent’s sides).

I’m happy to report that to honor my Norwegian great-grandparents, my uncle Kern has arranged for Lauritz and Elise’s names, where they immigrated from and their dates of arrival to the U.S. are going to be added to the last available rune stone at the Leif Erikson sculpture, a tribute to Scandinavian immigrants, at Shilshole Bay Marina in Seattle. The final stone will be added to the 13 existing runic-like stones arranged around the statue in the ancient tradition of a Viking ship. The stones display authentic Viking designs, and each stone holds plaques with the names of Scandinavian immigrants to honor their history.

leiferikson.org

Leif Erikson statue at Shilshole Bay Marina, Seattle, Washington Photo Credit: LeifErikson.org

Leif Erikson International Foundation (LEIF) commissioned a new base for the existing statue and a display of some 850 immigrants’ names. (More names were added in July 2010, for a total of 1,767.) The statue base is a large granite stone approximately six feet high, in the middle of a plaza. It is encircled with upright, runic-like stones, featuring authentic Viking carvings and plaques with the names of immigrants, along with their home towns and years of immigration.

The base and tribute display were designed by internationally known artist Jay Haavik, grandson of the former pastor of Ballard First Lutheran Church, the Rev. O. L. Haavik.

The Norseman Leif Erikson symbolizes the courage to venture to a new land.- leiferikson.org

leiferikson.org

Lauritz and Elise will be honored on a rune stone like this.
Rune stone, Leif Erikson Statue at Shilshole Bay Marina, Seattle, Washington
Photo Credit: LeifErikson.org

My next post will be about the concert we went to in Sandefjord, Norway to see Norwegian rock band Tainted Souls perform live. It was awesome!


Norwegian Vacation Part 1

by Lindy

Orange County, California to Norway
March 30 – April 13, 2013
Part 1 of the Epic Adventure

We had the most excellent two week trip in Norway! I’m compelled to recap our adventures before my memory completely fades, but I will break down our journey into a few different posts out of consideration for short attention spans. Although traveling with kids is not necessarily the most relaxing or fun, we feel it’s very important for our kids to experience the fun traveling and exposure to other cultures to broaden their knowledge of the world. I also wanted them to spend time with our Norwegian family and learn more about our ancestry (as much as what’s possible with a seven, five and two year old.)

This first post will cover the craziness that ensued just to arrive in Norway, the main highlights of our first two days as tourists in Oslo and I’ll finish the post with a thoughtful interpretation of a missing stage of life from the famous Vigeland Sculpture Park as told to me by our  Air BnB apartment host, Christian Krogh.

Throughout our trip, I took travel notes on my smart phone on a simple notepad app. It was the easiest and most accessible tool and as it’s an Android phone, it was easy to speak into the microphone to record my notes. The fun began at 4:30 a.m. Saturday morning, March 30th. We had an 8:30 flight on American Airlines, so we woke up 4:30 am. Everything went smoothly and we were confident of our travel mojo on the runway waiting to take off, until the pilot got on the intercom to tell us that the plane had a broken part and we needed to go back to the terminal to inspect it. After inspection, they said they needed to shuttle a crew of mechanics from Los Angeles to fix the broken part, so everyone needed to get off the plane, get their luggage from baggage claim and go to ticketing for new flights. !!WTF?!! Didn’t they realize our luggage was practically 6 feet tall since there was five of us traveling?! And only two of us were capable of carrying it (oh, actually one because it was too heavy for me.)

Photo Credit: Lindy Neubauer

Luggage Cart: (1) 50 lb. suitcase, (1) 40 lb. duffle bag, (2) big backpacks and (1) bag of car seats.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

7:00 am – Excited Traveler

7:30 am – Happy Traveler

Photo Credit: Lindy Neubauer

9:30 am – Angry Traveler

Photo Credit: Lindy Neubauer

9:45 am – Weary Travelers

But, we forged on and did as we were told. Round 2 with luggage, ticketing and security (not so easy)- we had new flights. We got to our gate and discovered our flight was delayed 30 minutes. No problem, we thought, we had time. The agent at the gate told us that the delay would make us miss our connecting flight, however, so we needed to be booked on yet another flight and there wasn’t showing anything available for us in the system. She recommended we go home and come back the next day to take the first flight out or that we could fly to London and stay the night there and fly to Oslo the following day. I would have chosen option #2 before choosing to go home and come back the next day. As a last resort she offered us the solution of taking a shuttle to Los Angeles airport, taking a red eye flight to London that evening and then flying to Oslo direct. We all agreed it was the best option, so we took it, however, we had to get our luggage out of baggage claim again, but by this point we were experts.

The rest of the flight details were a breeze once we got out of Orange County airport; they gave us excellent customer service throughout with food vouchers and bulkhead seating which were golden. I was so glad we weren’t pinched in the regular seats; the passengers were all trying to sleep and get comfortable in extremely cramped seats. I enjoyed watching Silverlining Playbook before drifting of into a nice slumber.

Some mishaps that occurred which kept us on our toes included our two year old son ‘doing his duty’ in his diaper right before landing and it went up and out of the back of his pants. Luckily, we had a change of clothes and did a quick presto-chango in the bathroom. Next, at airport security for our connecting flight in London Heathrow, he somehow gagged on his lollipop and started throwing up on himself just as we were taking off our shoes and laying everything out to go through x-ray. It was messy and smelly and distracting. Since we weren’t entirely focused at this point, we neglected to take out our iPads and other items from our bags to be scanned. Therefore we were flagged for closer scrutiny and Jonathan was frisked for good measure. But we pressed on and were rewarded with the most awesome indoor playground for kids where they could burn off energy while waiting for our connecting flight to Oslo. Our five year old peed her pants, because stopping playing to go to the bathroom is just a drag. Again, we were fortunate to have packed a spare pair of pants for such occasions – I’m a pro.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

London Heathrow Airport Hitchhiker

The final leg of the trip was a blur of shuttling, screening, waiting and various forms of transportation. We arrived in Oslo Gardermoen airport at 12:30 am Monday morning (eight hours ahead of California time) so we’d been on the go for over 34 hours at that point and still needed to retrieve our mound of luggage, go through customs, take the express train to Oslo Central Station and take a taxi to our rental apartment. We were all frazzled and extremely fatigued, but we made it happen. It wasn’t fun or easy, but we did it (with a lot of stares from onlookers.) We finally laid our heads on our pillows at 2:30 am (36 hours from start to finish) and although the kids were excellent travelers keeping their spirits and resilience up throughout, my daughters were in tears at that point saying that they didn’t like Norway and they wanted to go home.

I questioned our rationale for taking this big of a trip and assessed whether or not it was too ambitious of us. But we were certainly not going to go home at that point. After a solid night’s rest, everything looked sunny and bright again and we were ready to explore Oslo. We downloaded the Visit Oslo (tourist sites), NSB (trains) and Ruter Billett (bus) apps as well as Google Maps and our portable WiFi to navigate Oslo with relative ease. We also brought our Anker portable external battery chargers to help recharge everything on the go as needed.

Highlights from Monday in Oslo included: me slipping on a sheet of ice while walking to find a neighborhood restaurant that was recommended, eating pizza and a falafel at a “Friends” store when we discovered the restaurant and everything else was closed for the Easter holiday. Interestingly, the man at the counter asked me, “Do you want little or small falafel?” I said small and lo and behold, the ‘small’ was quite huge; I should have clarified before ordering.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Friends Store in Kvaernbyen Oslo
Everywhere we go, we take over the place.

Our tourist highlights that day was viewing the Palace and the changing of the guard and walking around the beautiful Aker Brygge harbor area and the kids played on an outdoor playground.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Oslo Royal Palace

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Changing of the Guard Oslo

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Rower water sculpture Aker Brygge Oslo

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Aker Brygge Oslo

We dined at a cozy restaurant called Rorbua that had a rustic and nautical decor. The menu had seafood and traditional Norwegian food and everything was delicious. We had a valuable economics lesson after that meal; it ended up costing us $200 USD! But still I’m happy we ate there instead of the alternatives of Big Horn Steakhouse or TGIF’s. I could justify and embrace spending that much on this fantastic dinner because we were still recovering from airplane food as well as an exteme case of travel fatigue.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Rorbua Restaurant Aker Brygge Oslo

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Steak at Rorbua

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Salmon at Rorbua

On Tuesday one of the highlights was Vigeland Sculpture Park where the kids played on the snowy playground, observed all the beautiful, naked sculptures and sledded down the icy steps near the phallic monolith in the center of the park.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Southern Californian girl at home in the snow.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Everywhere we travel, there must be a playground. Vigeland Park Oslo.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Universal playground fave. Vigeland Park Oslo.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Peek a boo. Vigeland Park Oslo.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Making friends in Norway.
Vigeland Park Oslo

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Vigeland Sculpture Park Oslo

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Here’s how we feel about traveling with kids.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Nordic Mama. Vigeland Park Oslo

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Girl huddle. Vigeland Park Oslo.

A rare photo of the the couple taken by their daughter.

A rare photo of the the couple taken by their daughter.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Traveling Troll at Vigeland Park Olso.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Sledding at Vigeland Park Olso.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Real life family sculpture. Vigeland Park Oslo.

We then went to the open air Folk Museum to see how Norwegians lived from the 1700s to present day.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Folk Museum Oslo

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Folk Museum Oslo

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Traveling Troll at the Folk Museum Oslo

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Folk Museum Oslo

Then we walked around the beautiful Opera House and took in the breathtaking views.

The Norwegian National Opera and Ballet House
Photo Credit: VisitOslo.com | Karianne Lund

Photo Credit: Lindy Neubauer

Statue of Norwegian Opera Legend, Kirsten Flagstad

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Opera House Oslo

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Annika at Opera House Oslo

Photo Credit: Jonathan Neubauer

Norwegian ingenuity and determination. Opera House Oslo.

We ended the day at an outdoor cafe called Skansen and enjoyed a glass of wine, apple cake and ice cream near Akershus Fortress.

Akershus Fortress Photo Credit: VisitOslo.com | Nancy Bundt

Apple Cake and Ice Cream at Skansen Cafe Oslo

Our host at our apartment rental, Christian, wrote in his ‘Guide to Oslo’ notes that there is a theme of life throughout Vigeland Sculpture Park but that there was one mysteriously missing. He challenges his guests to discover what that is, but if they can’t, to email him for his theory. We attempted to find the missing stage of life, but ultimately had to resort to emailing Christian. Here is his detailed explanation of Gustav Vigeland, the sculptor, and the missing stage of life.

“Gustav Vigeland was undoubtly a great artist but not a very sympathetic person. He was very focused on leaving a memorable location about himself and his art. He never got married but had a lot of female relationships. Why do so many girls like the bad guys? He did not treat the women nice. In fact it is stated that he was confronted on several occasion for beating them up. The theme of the park is “Life”. The park is supposed to show all shades of life. The “Monolitt” is supposed to symbolize the male genitals. As you so in the park you have newborn babies and old people. However, a pregnant woman is missing. Why when the theme is suppose to be all shades of life? We don’t know for sure but what we think is that G. Vigeland did not think that a pregnant woman was a pretty picture to portrait. 

G.Vigeland had a younger brother that also was an artist. Gustav made sure that nobody credited his younger brother’s work. During the war the younger brother got the nazi occupation authorities to give him a small chapel to decorate. He did a great work in this chapel. When you enter the chapel there is a big box right over the entrance door to the chapel. Vigeland was asked why he had placed this big box over the entrance door. Anyone entering the chapel had to bow their head to get in to the chapel. The younger version of Vigeland said that “I put it there because when I die I will use it as my coffin. If my older brother drops by to see what I have made, I want to make sure that he has to bow his head.” – Christian Krogh

WOW! Talk about a fascinating art history lesson!

Next, “Norwegian Vacation Part Two” will cover our five days in Larvik, my maternal great grandfather and great grandmother’s hometown, where we spent quality time with family.


Appreciate Your Mail Carrier This Christmas

by Lindy
My mail carrier's thank you note for my gift of chocolates.

My mail carrier’s thank you note for my gift of chocolates.

Free Shipping on Orders $99+

AD


Brandi Carlile and International Surfing Day

by Lindy

Brandi Carlile is coming to concert to the House of Blues Anaheim August 21st and yours truly will be there!

Brandi is a girl from my own roots – Maple Valley, Washington – with a gravelly, folk rock sound. Love, love, love!

I’ve picked up the guitar again and started lessons, so I’m hoping to learn a few of her songs.

 

Brandi Carlile, The Story

 

Photo: Here is the cover of Brandi's new album, Bear Creek, set for release on June 5!!  The album sequence is:

1 - Hard Way Home
2 - Raise Hell
3 - Save Part Of Yourself
4 - That Wasn't Me (Single available on iTunes here: http://bit.ly/HKS538)
5 - Keep Your Heart Young
6 - 100
7 - A Promise To Keep
8 - I'll Still Be There
9 - What Did I Ever Come Here For
10 - Heart's Content
11 - Rise Again
12 - In The Morrow
13 - Just Kids 

Look for Brandi's pre-order to be announced on May 8!
Brandi Carlile’s New Album, Bear Creek

 

Speaking of natural beauty, Happy International Surfing Day!

 

Find an ISD event near you!

 

 


Top
Theme by Selim Alvele | Copyright 2017 Lindy Neubauer – Kreative Haus | Powered by WordPress | 29 queries in 0.842 seconds.
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers